Mythical Sword Fighters in Shanghai

Discovering Plaid Cymru, the Party of Wales

Plaid Cymru, the Party of Wales

Plaid Cymru, the Party of Wales

The following essay, the fourth in a series of pieces engaged in Welsh and British politics, takes the position that the manifold deficits upon the Welsh political and economic landscape cannot be resolved by the current constitutional arrangement of the United Kingdom.  Moreover, against the background of the obsolescence of the constitutional order, Plaid Cymru, the Party of Wales will be introduced as an experienced and progressive voice in the Welsh experience, and as an option for an increasingly broad array of citizens in the General Elections of 2015.  Despite the fact that it has been around since 1925, still  too few in Wales itself know about a political party which is New Left, Green, Socially Liberal, Internationalist and Pro-Europe.  What makes Plaid Cymru different from the Westminster parties, including the Greens, is that the Party of Wales no longer believes that Westminster will or can fulfill the aspirations of the people of Wales for a better life.   Wales, in this light, needs a voice and direction of its own.

To read the essay, please visit Discovering Plaid Cymru, the Party of Wales

The British Wasteland: The Toxic Coalition and the Vultures of the Right

The British Wasteland: The Toxic Coalition and the Vultures of the Right

Cameron

Prime Minister David Cameron

On the Toxicity of the Coalition Government and the Cynicism of UKIP and the Tory Right

 

The British Wasteland: The Meaning of Cameron

As we can barely remember the debates between Nigel Farage and Nick Clegg, it appears that the odd man out has now obtained legitimacy, stature, plausibility. Nick Clegg was dreadful and failed to convey the very absurdity of UKIP policy on obvious grounds. The very fact that Nick Clegg stood on the same stage as Nigel Farage was a mistake and revealed his lack of political judgment.  Why were not the other two parties represented, as an all UK debate?  Or, was it, perhaps, merely a job interview for the junior partner of the next Coalition?

Clegg’s follow up criticism of Farage over Ukraine was a pathetic sideshow to the illegal Western involvement in a coup d’etat, in which fascists have now formally entered into the cabinet of a soon-to-be European government for the first time since WWII.  But, we all pretend that that did not happen and condemn Russia instead.  Farage was ironically correct on this issue that the Coalition government has ‘blood on its hands’ over Ukraine, and UKIP has never been as strong as it is today. It is now conceivable to imagine a Coalition Government in which they would be a part, such as a Conservative-UKIP alliance.

To read the rest of the article, please visit The British Wasteland

 

‘Bastion’, School of Humanities, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics

Karl Marx and the School’s adopted cat, Meow Tse Tung

In a Park in China (June 2014)

Fish in Shanghai

Fish in Garden Unit, Shanghai

PA FFORDD I GYMRU? MERCHER 9 GORFF, 7:30PM, ABERTEIFI

Beth yw dyfodol Cymru?

Cyfarfod cymunedol

Dewch a mynegi eich barn!

WALES PUBLIC MEETING - Cymru

YR ETHOLIAD CYFFREDINOL YN NES NA EICH BARN!
Rhaid i ni gymryd CYMRU YN ÔL GAN y Glymblaid!
Siaradwyr: Mike Parker, @mikeparkerwales, Ymgeisydd Plaid Cymru yng Ngheredigion ac Andy Chyba, Blaid Gwyrdd

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF WALES? COMMUNITY MEETING ON THE GENERAL ELECTIONS WEDNESDAY, July 9th 7:30PM Guild Hall, High Street, Cardigan

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF WALES?

COMMUNITY/PUBLIC MEETING

 ALL ARE WELCOME!

WEDNESDAY, 7:30PM Guildford Hall, Cardigan

WEDNESDAY, July 9th 7:30PM
Guild Hall, High Street, Cardigan


COME AND EXPRESS YOUR VIEWS!
THE GENERAL ELECTION IS CLOSER THAN YOU THINK!
WE CAN EITHER TAKE WALES BACK FROM THE COALITION OR LOSE THE LITTLE THAT WE STILL HAVE!
SPEAKERS INCLUDE MIKE PARKER, MP CANDIDATE FOR CEREDIGION AND ANDY CHYBA, LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE FOR THE GREEN PARTY

The Second Mystery: Employee Ownership and the Democratic Economy

employee

This essay, which is quite different than most of the essays on this site (especially as it unavoidably includes mathematical equations) explores that which is deemed here as the ‘second mystery’, which concerns why there are not more employee owned firms, given that they have been shown to be objectively more productive.  The first mystery, which was the focus of an investigation by Roger McCain in his ‘The Mystery of Worker Buyouts of Bankrupt Firms,’ examines the reason why workers will take over a bankrupt firm (a bankrupt country, global governance), even if it means a short-term fall in wages.  His conclusion is that the Neo-Classical economic theory of John Bates Clark, which depends upon the reductive notion of rational self-interest among workers, sets forth a false conception of the interests of the worker as a ‘one-dimensional man’ (Marcuse), and thus, cannot explain the complexity and depth of the decision-making process of workers in the crisis situation of a bankrupt firm or a bankrupt planet.

In this current essay, ‘The Second Mystery: Employee Ownership and the Democratic Economy’, in addition to giving a detailed account of McCain’s essay, sets forth the political and cultural reasons for the lack of confidence and interest by the banking sector in employee owned firms.  These reasons turn on the false picture of the worker in Neo-Classical economics and the anti-democratic prejudices of the ‘movers and shakers’ of the capitalist economy, including scholars of economics.  Beyond the alternative theoretical model set forth by McCain, which is based upon Game Theory and the capacity of workers to initiate subgame strategies in the context of an employee buyout of a bankrupt firm, the essay lays out historical examples of previous successful and non-successful attempts of employee ownership, emphasising the need for the creation of a Democratic Economy which is based on a revaluation of the intelligence and capacity for self-management of employees in the context of an ongoing concern – one of the most important of which is democracy itself (and its meaning).

To read this essay, please visit ‘The Second Mystery: Employee Ownership and the Democratic Economy.’

Lacan and Psychoanalysis: A Conversation between Andrew Stein and James Luchte

James Luchte

James Luchte

Andrew Stein

Andrew Stein

The following piece is a conversation between psychoanalyst Andrew Stein and philosopher James Luchte on Lacan and psychoanalysis that took place on 22 May 2014.

The conversation was prompted by an invitation by James Luchte to Andrew Stein to comment on his article, ‘Fatal Repetition: Badiou and the Age of the Poets, with an Appendix: A Psychoanalysis of Alain Badiou.

To read the conversation, please visit Lacan and Psychoanalysis: A Conversation between Andrew Stein and James Luchte

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